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Fence Post, Concrete or Wood

Discussion in ‘In the Garden’ began by RSource, 20 Feb 2007.

This topic originated from the How to page called Erecting the fence.

1 .
RSource

Joined: 20 Feb 2007

Messages: one

I am planning to build a vertical boarded fence, approx 2m in height, along with gaps in between the boards. Should i use concrete posts or wood posts, i have seen a lot of fencing locally in wooden posts which usually look good and are probably cheaper, yet i thought they would rot over time, Does anyone have any thoughts on this particular, Soil conditions are clay beneath the topsoil if that makes a positive change

Thanks advance for your help

RSource, 20 Feb 2007
#1

2.
JohnD

Concrete.

They are a little bit dearer to buy, and a lot weightier to hump around, but if you might have ever had to get a huge lump associated with concrete out of the ground after a wood post has rotted and damaged off, you will resolve never to make use of wooden posts again.

For attractiveness, you can paint the concrete articles and concrete gravel boards (which I also recommend) with dark brown brickwork paint to make them blend in using the stained timber. It is much simpler to paint them before installation.

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n228/JohnD_UK/POL_0108.jpg

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n228/JohnD_UK/POL_0107.jpg

JohnD, 20 Feb 2007
#2

3.
Nath.

Joined: 22 Feb 2007

Messages: 2

Thanks Received: 0

Location: Leicester

I’d go with what John said.

The concrete posts will stay strong for much longer.

Nath., 22 Feb 2007
#3

4.
Thermo

dont think me and david will ever agree on this one!

depends on what look you like. Concrete can look ugly when it begins to break down and spall off, specifically near the coast. If you are going to make use of timber your better going for four inch posts. they will last more years than a 3 inch post. Personally, i think timber looks better, and am hump out lumps of cement from fences all the time at work! every to his own though

Thermo, 22 Feb 2007
#4

5.
JohnD

Joined: 15 Nov 2005

Messages: 49, 375

Thanks Received: two, 332

Location: England

Thermo stated:
i hump out lumps associated with concrete from fences all the time at your workplace!
Click to expand…

Thermo is a big strong feller, Now i’m just a weed

JohnD, 22 Feb 2007
#5

6.
Deluks

Joined: 23 Feb 2005

Messages: six, 791

Thanks Received: 328

Location: Surrey

Either or, I’m seated on the fence with this one.

If any part of the fence backs on to an area where vehicles pass by after that use timber. Only takes a little knock from a careless driver along with a concrete post will crack. Timber posts are easier to repair/replace.

Deluks, 22 Feb 2007
#6

seven.
cuttertree

Joined: 30 Jan 2007

Messages: 21

Thanks Received: 1

Location: Clwyd

With concrete articles the panels can rattle within the wind, and can get a tad bad. With timber posts, the sections can be screws in tight, therefore no rattle. Also any restoration work due to wind damage is easier with timber posts

cuttertree, 23 Feb 2007
#7

8.
masona

Joined: 5 Jan 2003

Messages: 12, 881

Thanks Received: 125

Location: Essex

True, I’ve utilized concrete posts and covered the particular post in timber, no shake and no rot at the bottom of the articles in the future

There’s a photo of it someplace on here, god know exactly where it is

masona, 23 Feb 2007
#8

9.
Thermo

Joined: 21 Oct 2004

Messages: nine, 981

Thanks Received: 149

Location: Sussex

Country:

cuttertree said:
With concrete posts the sections can rattle in the wind, and may get a tad annoying. With wood posts, the panels can be anchoring screws in tight, so no shake. Also any repair work because of wind damage is a lot easier with wood posts
Click to expand…

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